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Avram Fisher, Founder & Portfolio Manager of Long Cast Advisers, is a former equity analyst at CSFB and BMO covering industrials and business services. He has prior experience in private equity; as a corporate governance analyst; as a writer; reporter and private investigator; and as a lifeguard and busboy (I still clear plates when my kids don't). This blog is an open book of ideas about patient investing and about starting up a small-cap focused RIA. It is part decision-diary, part investment observations and part general musings. Nothing on this blog is a solicitation for business nor a recommendation to buy or sell securities. It is simply a way to organize and share thoughts with an expanding audience of independent, patient and talented small cap investors. www.longcastadvisers.com

Thursday, August 24, 2017

Checking in on PSSR

A little more than a year ago I wrote about PSSR, which continues to generate cash and again trades for what seems to be a low valuation, below 6x EV / EBITDA, a 5% FCF yield, exposure to commercial airline, airport on time arrival and FAA technology budgets.

If someone impatient is selling, they're likely turned off by the recent decline in revenues and EBITDA, which have fallen off peak levels even as deferred revenues, which is an indicator of future revenues, has returned to near peak levels.



The company's quarterly statements indicate there's been a non-renewal impacting current earnings. But are these temporary or terminal issues?

In this case, the data indicate that even with Revenues and EBITDA declining - an expected outcome given a non-renewal - Deferred Revenues has grown back towards peak levels. To justify a strong a return on the stock at current levels, we would need to see Deferred Revenues continue to achieve new highs in the coming quarters. They are not there yet.





Our expectation for greater sales is buoyed by increased spending on sales personnel. The company has added former airline / FAA talent to market the product. If these are good hires then they will convert their expenses into sales and earnings.

However, SG&A spend is now up to 55% of revenues. The "normal" level is in the mid-40% range. Back of the envelope, they need to generate at +10% sales growth just to get back to "normal" and probably to justify their return on their SG&A spend and an investor's return on the stock.


No doubt, this is a competitive space and PSSR is a small player. Over the last year, I've talked with a handful of sources in the industry who work for larger competitors that offer a wider array of solutions (Navtech, now owned by Airbus; Jeppesen, owned by Boeing; IBM). None have heard of the company and most stressed the biggest issues facing all operators in the business - long order cycles and the industry's reluctance for technological change - as major headwinds, though one person thought PSSR's role as a big data warehouse with industry level information was qualitatively a positive differentiator.

It is possible that the company's marketing spend, which has propelled SG&A to new highs even as Revenue and EBITDA dip, is as good as torched cash. But deferred revenue growth indicates otherwise and furthermore increased marketing spend by rational actors is the kind of indicator that patient investors observe for signs that weigh the odds in favor of future growth.

A sale might also provide an exit for investors that does not charge our hopes. This is the same company whose Chairman (and largest shareholder) blithely told me two years ago that he's never sold because "it's more fun to compete with the big guys." He will have to prove this spirit for outside shareholders.

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5 comments:

  1. Good writeup. I was intrigued by the Chairman's position to not sell and decided to do some more digging.

    G S Beckwith Gilbert became Chairman around 1997-98 and has held notes since 2001 atleast. He's earned 6% - 9% interest depending on the year. Add in his salary, like you did in your writeup, and he's probably made 15% return for 15+ years.

    But it seems that he's also enabled PSSR to get to where they are currently. He loaned upto $10M in 2002-3 when the revenues were only in $2M range so that PSSR could build out their network. Eg: in 2004, rev was only $2.9M, but note outstanding to Chairman was $8.8M. Seems like he saw a compounding machine (Both interest on note and stock appreciation) and decided to keep it as independent company.

    The revenue CAGR from 2004-2016 is ~15%, and Book value has gone from -6.6M to 12.6M. So good history and seems promising for the future too given their deferred revenue increasing as shown in your chart.

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  2. An odd thing about PSSR: They have 49 employees according to 10K, but there are 21 listed executives on their website, many of them hired recently. I've never seen such a top heavy team, but it indicates that this is a relationship based sales model.

    I can see two potential outcomes:
    a. Highly paid executives bring in more sales and earnings go higher
    or
    b. They don't bring in enough sales and PSSR can cut down spending

    Both cases look good for stockholders. I'm not invested in PSSR, but its looking interesting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. another corollary to the hiring spree could be that the product isn't so good so they need more people to sell it(?)

      whatever the reasons, they've loaded up on expensive execs which is why SG&A has grown so much and they need to grow sales to get a return on this expense.

      but i've heard from other folks in the industry "that's how it's done (ie relationship based selling)" + looooong sales cycles = we don't know if / when they'll get a return on that investment.

      a rational review implies they expect a better return than they would on an outright sale but as I indicated, they don't seem keen on selling.

      this business isn't going away so i am content to patiently wait

      Delete
    2. Your approach to wait patiently makes sense since there's limited downside and potentially big upside (based on deferred revenue and higher sales spend)

      Delete
  3. here are links to the broward county FLL agreement that PSSR press released

    agreement summary >> http://cragenda.broward.org/docs/2017/CCCM/20170613_542/24809_Exhibit%201%20-%20Agreement%20Summary.pdf

    purchasing agent's report >> http://cragenda.broward.org/docs/9999/CCCM/99990909_423/24809_Exhibit%203%20-%20Most%20Reasonable%20Source%20Memorandum.pdf

    ReplyDelete